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News & Events

Adult Coloring for Stress Reduction

Friday September 22, 11:30 AM - 1:00 PM
Meeting Room 2

Come and enjoy coloring beautiful patterns and pictures without the stress of the woes of the outside world.
The library will provide coloring pencils and pages, or you may bring your own.
Drop-in, no registration.

Jazz Up Close

Saturday September 23, 1:30 - 3:15 PM
Hubbard Room

Resonant Motion, Inc. presents the second event in its 2017 'Crossing Cultures” program through the popular Jazz Up Close series on Saturday, September 23 at 1:30 pm in the Russell Library’s Hubbard Room. For this event Brazilian drummer and percussionist Rogério Boccato leads an eclectic quartet featuring alto saxophonist Kris Allen, bassist Henry Lugo.

As a longtime member of the 'Orquestra Jazz Sinfônica do Estado de São Paulo,” Rogério played with Antonio Carlos Jobim, Hermeto Pascoal, Milton Nascimento, Egberto Gismonti, João Bosco, and Joe Zawinul, among many others. Since moving to the U.S. ten years ago, he has become a first-call percussionist in many jazz ensembles, including those of Maria Schneider, Kenny Garrett, John Patitucci, Fred Hersch, Billy Childs, Jimmy Greene, and Danilo Perez. He also continued to collaborate with prominent Brazilian artists such as Toninho Horta, Dori Caymmi, Moacir Santos, and Vinicius Cantuária. Rogério is on the faculty at Manhattan School of Music and was previously on the percussion faculty at the Hartt School of Music.

This event is supported in part by Shoreline Arts Alliance, Inc., in partnership with the Connecticut Office of the Arts and the National Endowment for the Arts, and by the Middletown Commission on the Arts.

Classic Mystery Book Discussion - The Postman Always Rings Twice

Tuesday September 26, 6:30 - 7:30 PM
Meeting Room 2

For September we will be reading The Postman Always Rings Twice (1934) by James M. Cain. It is considered by many to be one of the most important, most successful, and most controversial novels of all time. Frank Chambers, a drifter, falls in love with Cora, the dissatisfied wife of a diner owner in rural California. Together they plot the death of her husband, Nick, so that Cora can run the diner and marry Nick. Complications ensue.

Copies will be available at the circulation desk. Drop-in; no sign-up.

Yoga In The Courtyard

Saturday September 30, 11 AM - 12 Noon
Courtyard (Hubbard Room for rain)

No prior experience necessary, and no mats will be used. Our instructor will be Jeff Hush, founder of Food and Movement Therapy and a local instructor of Family Yoga, Tai Chi and Chair Yoga. Come experience how practicing yoga can help you feel calmer and more energetic, and learn how it can also help support a stronger immune system and better sleep patterns.
Depending on the weather, the class may meet in the Hubbard Room.
Sponsored by The Friends of the Russell Library.

Connecticut Civilian Conservation Corps Camps: Supervised by WWI Officers

Saturday September 30, 1:00 - 2:30 PM
Hubbard Room

Author and historian Marty Podskoch will give a presentation on his new book Connecticut Civilian Conservation Camps: History, Memories & Legacy of the CCC, which will focus on WWI Officers who supervised the camps.

The Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC) began on March 31, 1933 under President Roosevelt’s 'New Deal” to relieve the poverty and unemployment of the Depression. Twenty-one amps were set up in many Connecticut towns, state parks & forests. Roosevelt choose the Army to supervise the camps and many of the officers had served in WWI. Workers built trails, roads, campsites, & dams, stocked fish, built & maintained fire tower observer’s cabins & telephone lines, fought fires, & planted millions of trees. The CCC disbanded in 1942 due to the need for men in WW II.

Marty Podskoch is a retired teacher and the author of seven other books: Adirondack Civilian Conservation Corps Camps: Their History, Memories and Legacy of the CCC; Fire Towers of the Catskills: Their History and Lore; Adirondack Fire Towers: Their History and Lore, the Southern Districts; Adirondack Fire Towers: Their History and Lore, the Northern Districts; Adirondack Stories: Historical Sketches; 101 more Adirondack Stories: Historical Sketches and The Adirondack 102 Club: Your Passport and Guide to the North Country. He also writes a weekly column called 'Adirondack Stories,' which appears in five Adirondack newspapers.
Presently, Marty Podskoch is conducting research on the Civilian Conservation Camps in Rhode Island. He is keenly interested in meeting individuals who may have CCC stories to contribute to his next book. Marty Podskoch will have all of his books available after the presentation for sale and signing.

Racial Justice Book Group

Tuesday, October 3 
6PM-7:45PM in
Meeting Room 2
The Hate U Give,
by Angie Thomas

Sixteen-year-old Starr Carter moves between two worlds: the poor neighborhood where she lives and the fancy suburban prep school she attends. The uneasy balance between these worlds is shattered when Starr witnesses the fatal shooting of her childhood best friend Khalil at the hands of a police officer. Khalil was unarmed.
Soon afterward, his death is a national headline. Some are calling him a thug, maybe even a drug dealer and a gangbanger. Protesters are taking to the streets in Khalil's name. Some cops and the local drug lord try to intimidate Starr and her family. What everyone wants to know is: what really went down that night? And the only person alive who can answer that is Starr.

But what Starr does or does not say could upend her community. It could also endanger her life.

Goodreads Review: “This book is the most powerful book I've ever read. It is important, educational, and happening in our world right now as you're reading this review. If you can only read one book in 2017, please pick this one.”

Contact person is Christy Billings: cbillings@russelllibrary.org or by calling 860 347-2528 ext 122.
This book group is open to anyone, no registration necessary. The Racial Justice Book Group will meet the first Tuesday of the month through 2017. The Racial Justice Book Group is in partnership with the Middletown Racial Justice Community.

 

World War I Discussion Series

Wednesdays, October 4, 11, 18, and 25, 10:00 a.m.-11:00 a.m.
Conference Room, Senior and Community Center, 61 Durant Terrace, Middletown, CT

Join a discussion series to explore the American experience of war and its role in shaping the contemporary world.   Selected readings from World War One and

America: Told by the Americans Who Lived It, a compilation of first person accounts written by Americans who experienced it firsthand, will be discussed.  Participants are encouraged to read the selected readings prior to the event. Free copies of the readings are available at the Russell Library or online at the links listed below.  The discussion series will be facilitated by Army veteran, historian, and librarian, Arthur Meyers.  For additional information, please call the Russell Library at 860-347-2520.

Topics/Readings from World War I and America:

 

World War I and America: A Centennial Discussion Series/ Evening Program

Wednesdays, October 4, 11, 18, and 25, 7:00 p.m.
Meeting Room 2, Russell Library, 123 Broad Street, Middletown, CT

The Russell Library invites veterans and their families, together with the public, to explore the American experience of war and its role in shaping the contemporary world.  Selected readings from World War One and America: Told by the Americans Who Lived It, a compilation of first person accounts written by Americans who experienced it firsthand, will be discussed.  Participants are encouraged to read the selected readings prior to the event.  Free copies of the readings are available at the library or online at the links listed below. The discussion series will be facilitated by Army veteran, historian, and librarian, Arthur Meyers.  For more information, please email drusso@russelllibrary.org or call 860-347-2520.

Topics/Readings from World War I and America:

World War I on the Big Screen: Sergeant York 

Thursday, October 5, 6:00 -8:00 p.m.
 Hubbard Room, Russell Library, 123 Broad Street, Middletown, CT

Join us for a screening and discussion of Howard Hawks’ 1941 biopic of WWI hero Alvin C. York. Sergeant York stars Gary Cooper as York, a Tennessee farmer and pacifist drafted at the onset of America’s involvement in WWI. York’s expert marksmanship earns him quick promotion and forces him to come to terms with his beliefs. It is a story of conversion, heroism, and moral fortitude, for which Cooper received an Academy Award. Cooper’s performance as the reluctant hero who views his actions as necessary but not honorable, in many ways embodies America’s collective attitude to WWI. The film depicts WWI in human terms while speaking to America on the eve of WWII.

Scott Higgins is Chair and Professor of the College of Film and the Moving Image at Wesleyan University. He teaches courses on film history, genre, and aesthetics. His books include Harnessing the Technicolor Rainbow; Arnheim for Media Studies; and most recently Matinee Melodrama: Playing with Formula in the Sound Serial.

Russell Library Veteran’s Writing Group Explores World War One

Thursdays, October 12, 19, and 26, 7:00 p.m.
Meeting Room 2, Russell Library, 123 Broad Street, Middletown, CT

The Russell Library invites veterans and their families, together with the public, to join the Russell Library Veteran’s Writing Group for a three part series to explore the American experience of war and its role in shaping the contemporary world. The library will present selected readings from World War One and America: Told by the Americans Who Lived It, a compilation of first person accounts written by Americans on the battlefield and at home. Participants will be encouraged to write about their personal military experiences or to respond to the readings. If they choose, they may share their essays with others in the group, or with family and friends. 

Alias Grace: A Book Discussion

Books available September 1st.
Discussion date is Thursday, October 12, 6:30pm. 

The Hubbard Room, Russell Library, 123 Broad Street, Middletown. Join us for a discussion of Margaret Atwood's 1996 novel Alias Grace. Based on the true story of the murders of Thomas Kinnear and his housekeeper Nancy Montgomery in 1843, Atwood develops the character of Grace Marks, one of the people convicted of the crime. Unlike her 'co-conspirator' James McDermott, Grace Marks was not hanged. Instead, she was sentenced to life in prison, spending some years in a 'Lunatic Asylum'. The novel has been adapted as a six-part miniseries that will air on Canadian television in September 2017. Netflix will be streaming the show beginning in November.

Copies of the book will be available beginning September 1st at the Borrowing Desk. Please sign up for the discussion online at our events calendar.

 

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